Military History Roundtable

Fort Meigs Military History Roundtable

The Bentley Lecture Series was created in memory of Christopher Perky who served at Fort Meigs during the War of 1812.

JANUARY 21, 2021 AT 7:30 PM – READING THE COLOR: MANUSCRIPT MILITARY MAPPING IN 18TH CENTURY LOUISBOURG, NOVA SCOTIA

Mary Pedley is the Adjunct Assistant Curator of Maps at the William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan. She is the author of several books focused on mapmakers and the map trade in eighteenth century France and England and the co-editor of the recently published History of Cartography, Volume Four: Cartography in the European Enlightenment (2019, University of Chicago Press). Her talk will highlight the rich collection of manuscript military maps housed in the Clements Library.

Click here to view the recording of this lecture on YouTube
Click here to Learn more about the History of Cartography Project: Volume Four Cartography in the European Enlightenment, eds. Matthew Edney and Mary Pedley.
Click here to visit the Clements Library webpage.
Click here for the Quarto issue: Coloring Manuscript Maps in the Eighteenth Century.
Click Here to view the recording of this Lecture

FEBRUARY 18, 2021 AT 7:30 PM – STEWARDS OF CEREMONY: THE STORY OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY BAND – PERSHING’S OWN

Welcome Master Sergeant Leigh LaFosse from The U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own” as she discusses the history of Pershing’s Own and joins together with Fort Meigs Program Manager John Thompson to discuss the evolving role of musicians in the U.S. Army

Click here to connect to the lecture on Zoom.
Enter Zoom Meeting ID: 992 0592 7050
Click here to download a calendar reminder for this lecture
Click here to learn more about MSG LaFosse
Click here read a brief overview of the history of the US Army Band

MARCH 18, 2021 AT 7:30 PM TALK POSTPONED — PETER COZZENS, AUTHOR OF TECUMSEH AND THE PROPHET

Welcome Peter Cozzens as he discusses his new book, Tecumseh and the Prophet.
About Tecumseh and the Prophet:

The first biography of the great Shawnee leader in more than twenty years, and the first to make clear that his misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa, was an equal partner in the last great pan-Indian alliance against the United States.

Until the Americans killed Tecumseh in 1813, he and his brother Tenskwatawa were the co-architects of the broadest pan-Indian confederation in United States history. In previous accounts of Tecumseh’s life, Tenskwatawa has been dismissed as a talentless charlatan and a drunk. But award-winning historian Peter Cozzens now shows us that while Tecumseh was a brilliant diplomat and war leader–admired by the same white Americans he opposed–it was Tenskwatawa, called the “Shawnee Prophet,” who created a vital doctrine of religious and cultural revitalization that unified the disparate tribes of the Old Northwest. Detailed research of Native American society and customs provides a window into a world often erased from history books and reveals how both men came to power in different but no less important ways.

Cozzens brings us to the forefront of the chaos and violence that characterized the young American Republic, when settlers spilled across the Appalachians to bloody effect in their haste to exploit lands won from the British in the War of Independence, disregarding their rightful Indian owners. Tecumseh and the Prophet presents the untold story of the Shawnee brothers who retaliated against this threat–the two most significant siblings in Native American history, who, Cozzens helps us understand, should be writ large in the annals of America.

Photo credit: Fort Meigs